The Year Women Got ‘Horny’ – Smart Media Magazine

The Year Women Got ‘Horny’


In 1992, Madonna’s artistic exploration of her own horniness was brought to the mainstream with the release of her coffee table book, “Sex,” and her album “Erotica.” Both efforts were, at the time, received with vitriol by critics who believed she had “gone too far,” but are considered today as misunderstood masterpieces.

The market for vibrators is a fast and dirty way to grasp the glacial pace of progress in this matter. Good Vibrations, the pioneering, women-friendly sex-toy retailer, was founded in San Francisco in 1977.

Twenty years later, vibrator shopping was depicted as a healthy and normal element of female sexuality on an episode of “Sex and the City,” and then another 20 years after that, vibrators became available for sale in Walmart. And yet, despite sex toys for women being stocked and sold in the largest retailer in America, there are still plenty of people who still just don’t get it.

“The narrative, that women don’t get as horny as men, is starting, very slowly, to crack,” Ms. Benoit said. “I think it’s going to take a long time because the bedrock of that belief is still there.”

The age-old misperception that men get horny and women don’t was sharply addressed and debunked in a 2017 episode of “Big Mouth,” Netflix’s animated series about a group of seventh graders navigating their way through puberty. The episode is called “Girls Are Horny Too,” and the revelation promised by the title makes several (male) characters’ heads explode.

Female adolescent sexuality was also explored in the first season of “Pen15,” Hulu’s comedy series about two 13-year-old girls — played by adult women, Maya Erskine and Anna Konkle — in “middle school as it really happened.” In the episode “Ojichan,” Ms. Erskine’s character discovers masturbation and it quickly becomes an obsession that dominates her life.



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